Welcome.

Glad you stopped by. I hope you'll stop by again for Monday Morning Musings, Meet the Author Thursday, Weekend Writing Warriors, and guests whenever they drop in.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

#WeWriWa - NUMBERS NEVER LIE: She's Mad At You


Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors where authors share an 8 - 10 sentence snippet. Be sure to visit the other authors. You can find them here

Thanks for all your comments on last week's snippet from my work-in-progress, a romantic suspense, Numbers Never Lie. I'm in the home stretch for finishing this book. This week, I was laid low by a nasty cough, sore throat, and headache, so I didn't finish today as I planned.

Suggestions are always welcome on the blurb as well as the snippet. 

Today's snippet follows last week's. Drew is on a camping trip with his daughter, Ellen, and seven other girls, organized by Maggie. After telling Drew there are no toilets, Ellen stalks off to be with her friends.

“Hey, come back here, honey, I’m sure this is a little misunderstanding—c’mon, Ellen.” In the year since his wife died, he and Ellen had had a lot of misunderstandings.
“I think she’s mad at you.”
Drew turned toward the quiet voice behind him. There she was, leaning back against a tree, her knee bent and booted foot propped against the trunk—Maggie Sinclair, Director of Camp Hell. He knew Jack’s sister was an outdoor nut, but he didn’t think she was this bad. Pissing in the bushes, for God’s sake.
Maggie was a tall woman, only a few inches shorter than his own six feet, with the tan of a person who spent time outdoors and laugh crinkles around her eyes—still the roughneck tomboy he’d grown up with. Who else would want to spend a summer day backpacking on dusty trails through snagging underbrush instead of out on a perfectly manicured golf course where you only ventured into the rough to retrieve an errant ball?


 This is the tentative blurb:

A shocking secret brings danger to Jack Sinclair and his sister Maggie. 

As kids, they were the fearless threesome. As adults, Jack's an accountant; Drew, a lawyer; Maggie, a teacher and camping troop leader. Returning from a weekend camping trip, Maggie receives horrifying news. She refuses to believe her brother’s fatal car crash was an accident. If the police won’t investigate, she’ll do it herself. Convincing Drew Campbell to help is her only recourse.

Drew Campbell was too busy to return his best friend’s phone call. Too busy to attend a camping meeting important to his teen daughter. Too busy to stay in touch with Jack. Logic and reason indicate Jack’s accident was just that--an accident caused by fatigue and fog. Prodded by guilt, he’ll help Maggie even if he thinks she’s wrong.

A break-in at Jack’s condo convinces Maggie she’s right. Then her home is searched. What did Jack leave behind?


Happy Easter to all who celebrate. Since I'll be with my family on Sunday, I'll come around on Monday and Tuesday to read your snippets. 


Monday, March 26, 2018

#AmReading Should Be #AmWriting

My work-in-progress, NUMBERS NEVER LIE, a romantic suspense is coming along well. I'd tell you to look to the right to see my progress, but something screwy happened to my site. This morning, the widgets (with percentage of progress) were gone and those weird "things" in their place. If anyone knows how to fix this, please tell me.

As I started to say, I'm in the last 18% of my WIP. Not celebrating yet, but the end is near. In fact, I've already written the end (15 years ago), but it's quite sketchy. That's where the last 13,000 words come in. My plan is to have it finished by Sunday. Come back for next Monday where I'll announce that I finished . . . or not.

As the title of this post says, I've been reading instead of writing for the past several days. Why, when I'm so close to the end? Tomorrow is book group, and I hadn't read the book. Not because of procrastination, mind you. I was waiting for my turn to borrow the ebook from the library. On Friday, I checked, and there's still three people ahead of me. I broke down and bought the book, Same Kind of Different As Me.

I was in such a hurry to read the book, I didn't take time to note the authors. And because I like to read a book without prejudice, I didn't read reviews or even the blurb. I assumed the story was fiction (don't ask why). When I got to a particularly heart-wrenching segment, I thought, wow, this author must have gone through something similar to write so vividly. Duh. It wasn't fiction. It was a true story. I almost feel ridiculous admitting this. (That's what happens when I'm in a hurry.)

Same Kind of Different As Me (if you aren't familiar with the book or movie) is the story of two men and the woman who brought them together and bound them to each other. Ron Hall and Denver Moore were two men who should never have met, except for Ron's wife Deborah. Wealthy--really wealthy--the Texas Halls had everything they could ever want. Denver grew up an extremely poor Louisiana sharecropper, spent time in prison, and was homeless most of his life. The book reveals how those two men met and changed each other's lives.

Some people believe strongly in sharing their religious beliefs. For me, religion is a private thing, so I'm uncomfortable around evangelizers. Too often, those people spout the Bible, but their actions say just the opposite. Not Deborah Hall. One day, she decided that they should volunteer at a homeless shelter one day a week, where they became known as Mr. & Mrs. Tuesday. These do-gooders were regarded with suspicions, like the people who only came on holidays then disappeared the rest of the year. Over nine years, the Halls influenced many people by their example of doing God's work. The one person they had the most influence over was Denver Moore. At sixty, he'd seen a lot of trouble, some of his own making. More suspicious than most, he resisted their caring, assuming they were talk only. How the three became friends, family even, is a powerful story.

Book groups have always "forced" me to read outside my comfort zone. I love fiction. I write fiction. But book groups have introduced me to new authors, new genres. I've never found true stories, especially triumph over adversity, of particular interest. I wouldn't have chosen Same Kind of Different As Me to read. I'm glad I did. There should be a lively discussion tomorrow night. I'll add a comment about that.


Saturday, March 24, 2018

#WeWriWa - NUMBERS NEVER LIE Sweaty and Dirty


Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors where authors share an 8 - 10 sentence snippet. Be sure to visit the other authors. You can find them here

Thanks for all your comments on last week's snippet from my work-in-progress, a romantic suspense, Numbers Never Lie.

Suggestions are very welcome on the blurb as well as the snippet. 

Today's snippet immediately follows last week's. Drew is on a camping trip with his daughter and seven other girls, organized by Maggie. He pulled his daughter aside to ask where the bathrooms are. Her disgust with him not listening to her ends last week's snippet.


 She didn’t believe him? What happened to the adulation for him that used to be in her eyes? The “Dad is perfect” look.
As he’d done several times in the past three hours, he took out his handkerchief, looked at it in disgust, and tried to find a clean spot. He wiped the sweat off his forehead. It was hot and sticky, more like August in Michigan than June. Drew intensely disliked sweating. Clean sweat—in a gym—was all right. Not this . . . dirt. More than sweaty, he hated being dirty.


This is the tentative blurb:

A shocking secret brings danger to Jack Sinclair and his sister Maggie. 

As kids, they were the fearless threesome. As adults, Jack's an accountant; Drew, a lawyer; Maggie, a teacher and camping troop leader. Returning from a weekend camping trip, Maggie receives horrifying news. She refuses to believe her brother’s fatal car crash was an accident. If the police won’t investigate, she’ll do it herself. Convincing Drew Campbell to help is her only recourse.

Drew Campbell was too busy to return his best friend’s phone call. Too busy to attend a camping meeting important to his teen daughter. Too busy to stay in touch with Jack. Logic and reason indicate Jack’s accident was just that--an accident caused by fatigue and fog. Prodded by guilt, he’ll help Maggie even if he thinks she’s wrong.

A break-in at Jack’s condo convinces Maggie she’s right. Then her home is searched. What did Jack leave behind?



Monday, March 19, 2018

Monday Morning Musing

Good Morning!


I've shared character sketches from four characters in my work-in-progress Numbers Never Lie. That's all for now. The story is really coming together quickly as the end approaches. (See my progress on the widget to the right.) I mentioned before that I started this story back in 2003, updated technology, and did quite a bit of editing. I'm a better writer now than 15 years ago. (I should be!) Having versions of the story saved on 3.25 floppies presented a challenge. Gathering together the best of what I'd written before and changing the focus became easier as I plunged into this romantic suspense. Yesterday, I found two scenes that I knew I'd written. Halleluia. 

My goal is to finish the first draft by April 1st (no joke). Since I periodically go back and edit as I write, much of the draft is in good shape. Then I plan to get it to my editor by mid-April. If I stay on target, the book should be released by Mother's Day. That's my plan. Hopefully, I make my deadlines.

Life has a way of smacking you down when you get too full of yourself. Or as John Lennon said, "Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans." Isn't that the truth? I'm sure there will surprises between now and Mother's Day.



Spring has come to Michigan. Finally. Winter will give us another taste as it fades away. The ducks and geese have returned to the pond behind our house. So has the muskrat. Apparently, he (or she) decided to make the bank in front of our house its home. Hubs has tried nearly everything to make it find another home, even to the extent of pouring cement into the holes. Muskrat just made more. Smart critter. He doesn't bother us, except for the possibility of breaking a leg by stepping into a hole while mowing near the water.




We went to a Pinewood Derby race on Saturday. Oldest grandson's Cub Scout Pack sponsored the event. He asked Hubs to help with making the car. My husband has always been patient with kids (with me, too, LOL). And he has the tools for the kids to use. BTW, they let siblings race their cars, too, after the Cub Scouts finish their race, so oldest granddaughter built a car and raced it, too. I was impressed with the layout. It sure was different from when Son participated with a wood track and the adults eyeballing the winner. A metal track with an electronic gadget that recorded the outcome of each heat (4 cars raced in a heat), a huge screen that showed the outcome. Each car raced in four heats. Neither of the grandkids' cars won. As a result, he and his sister decided to start working on their cars during Christmas break. Instead of trying to do everything in 3 weekends. Good planning.


A week ago, we attended oldest granddaughter's 5th grade orchestra concert. Since the kids have only been playing their instruments for 6 months, I expected to hear a lot of squeaks and out of tune notes. (Both our kids played band instruments, so we've been to concerts before.) The kids did well, much better than I expected. Short pieces. Their teacher explained their progress from two or three lines of music to a full page. Granddaughter plays the violin. Her cousin, Toddler Girl, came, too. She announced she's going to play piano. That's exciting. We went to a lot of piano recitals, too, featuring her daddy and her aunt. 


The twins are growing like proverbial weeds. Eight and five pounds at birth, they're now 12 and 18 pounds. The linebacker and the quarterback. More importantly (to me) than physical growth is their engaging with others. The smiles and coos are delightful. The linebacker even "talks" to us. Sure wish we knew what he's saying. The little one is very active, arm and leg movements and grins. Melts my heart when he smiles. He babbles, too. Love it.


With Spring here, Hubs is raring to get outside and work in the garden. I'm enjoying the sunshine. Looking forward to a good week of writing. Not looking forward to getting ready for taxes. 


On Wednesday, my monthly column on Family Life at Pandora's Box Gazette is on Reading.


On Saturday, starting at 9am EDT, I'm participating in a "get to know the contributors chat" with other Pandora contributors and readers. If you have time, I'd love if you stopped by. 

https://www.pandorasboxjt.com/forum/meet-the-authors

Of course, on the weekend, I'll post another snippet here from Numbers Never Lie with the Weekend Writing Warriors.


Have a great week!



Saturday, March 17, 2018

#WeWriWa - NUMBERS NEVER LIE: No Toilets?


Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors where authors share an 8 - 10 sentence snippet. Be sure to visit the other authors. You can find them here

Thanks for all your comments on last week's snippet. I'm glad you like the new title for my work-in-progress, a romantic suspense, Numbers Never Lie.

Suggestions are very welcome on the blurb as well as the snippet. Please excuse the rogue commas.

Today's snippet immediately follows last week's, which ended chapter 1; this is the beginning of chapter two.


“What do you mean no toilets?” Drew Campbell stopped on the dusty forest path, hooked his sunglasses on the placket of his golf shirt, and stared at his daughter.
“Dad-dy,” Was Ellen only fourteen? She did exasperation better than his administrative assistant, “I told you we were camping.”
Not for a moment would Drew reveal that camping was not what he remembered her saying a week ago—she said she wanted him to come along on an outing with her little group of friends, and he figured a hike, picnic lunch, then home for supper.
He got a big surprise when he opened the hatch of the Navigator and found five backpacks—five backpacks with bedrolls—and he’d transported four girls. It didn’t take a law degree to figure out who the fifth backpack was for. He was in deep shit, but what could he say in front of Ellen and her friends?
“Of course, sweetie, I knew we were camping,” he lied.
“Yeah, right, Dad.”


Here's the tentative blurb:

A shocking secret brings danger to Jack Sinclair and his sister Maggie. 

As kids, they were the fearless threesome. As adults, Jack's an accountant; Drew, a lawyer; Maggie, a teacher and camping troop leader. Returning from a weekend camping trip, Maggie receives horrifying news. She refuses to believe her brother’s fatal car crash was an accident. If the police won’t investigate, she’ll do it herself. Convincing Drew Campbell to help is her only recourse.

Drew Campbell was too busy to return his best friend’s phone call. Too busy to attend a camping meeting important to his teen daughter. Too busy to stay in touch with Jack. Logic and reason indicate Jack’s accident was just that--an accident caused by fatigue and fog. Prodded by guilt, he’ll help Maggie even if he thinks she’s wrong.

A break-in at Jack’s condo convinces Maggie she’s right. Then her home is searched. What did Jack leave behind?



Thursday, March 15, 2018

Guest: Shannon Lawrence's New Release & #GiveAway

I'm excited to welcome Shannon Lawrence today. I know Shannon through the Insecure Writers Support Group. While I don't read creepy horror stories (you know me, the original scaredy cat), for those of you who enjoy horror, Shannon's book sounds deliciously scary. I'm so happy to support her.




Blue Sludge Blues & Other Abominations
by Shannon Lawrence

Release Date: March 15, 2018
Horror short story collection


A collection of frights, from the psychological to the monstrous. These tales are a reminder of how much we have to fear: A creature lurking in the blue, sludgy depths of a rest area toilet; a friendly neighbor with a dark secret hidden in his basement; a woman with nothing more to lose hellbent on vengeance; a hike gone terribly wrong for three friends; a man cursed to clean up the bodies left behind by an inhuman force. These and other stories prowl the pages of this short story collection.

On Sound Advice

Diane asked me to write something about one of the stories in this collection. I thought it would be fun to discuss the short story "Sound Advice," about a family traveling through Navajo lands at night, who run into a creature determined to get to them inside their car.

Because I wrote snippets about what inspired the stories at the end of the collection, let's talk about Joe Ravenshadow, a secondary character in "Sound Advice." Throughout this family's ordeal, Ravenshadow is a creepy side note, a DJ playing eerie songs and talking about the skinwalker, which is a no-no. You never give voice to skinwalkers. I hope I chose songs that are easily recognizable to most readers. Songs like Bad Moon Rising and Little Red Riding Hood. Songs most of us enjoy, but also songs that can be frightening when heard at just the right moment.

Not sure what skinwalkers are? They're a Navajo "myth," a witch or medicine man with great power, who has killed someone close to them, a family member, in order to gain the power of skinwalking. By day, they may walk among their fellow tribal members, but by night they walk on all fours. They can turn into any animal, but often choose the coyote, a sly nocturnal animal.

Skinwalkers try to lure their victims out by banging on walls and even imitating the sound of a crying infant, preying on those who would show concern that a baby is in danger.

Excerpt


From Sound Advice:

"They both sat, listening. There it was again: the sound of an infant crying. Only, there was no way there could be a baby out there. There wasn't anything out there, save plant life, rocks, and some strange creature that appeared to be messing with them. Bill reached over and clicked the door lock button."


Buy the Book


Also available from Apple and other countries through Amazon


About the Author


A fan of all things fantastical and frightening, Shannon Lawrence writes mostly fantasy and horror. Her stories can be found in magazines and anthologies, including Space and Time Magazine, Dark Moon Digest, and Ember: A Journal of Luminous Things. When she's not writing, she's hiking the wilds of Colorado and photographing her magnificent surroundings, where, coincidentally, there's always a place to hide a body or birth a monster.


Social Media Links



Wednesday, March 14, 2018

#NewRelease: A MURDER OF PRINCIPLE by Susan Coryell

I'm happy to share some great news. Susan Coryell has a new release. I was fortunate to receive an Advanced Reading Copy of A MURDER OF PRINCIPLE for review (see below). As a former teacher myself, I especially enjoyed the setting for this murder mystery.


What happens when an unscrupulous principal threatens to destroy a model high school?
 Blurb: 
A new principal takes Harding High by storm, wreaking havoc with every executive order, every decision, tearing down the stellar school tenet by tenet. Teachers, other administrators, students, parents—the community at large increasingly react to the tremors shaking Harding High as Principal Wendy Storme churns a destructive path through their traditions, values and protocol. Everyone seems to have a valid motive for murder.
English department chair, Rose Lane, and her rookie sidekick, intern Penny Bright, are determined to move the hurricane force Storme out of Harding for good…except that somebody beats them to it with the decisiveness of murder.
Excerpt:
With a blast of nerves,
Rose pushed open the door and moved inside the large, windowless room. Settling her eyes on the principal’s desk, she noticed that the woman’s position was oddly out of the ordinary; her limbs stretched unnaturally and her neck twisted away to the side. The desk itself was covered in a flurry of papers and every drawer had been pulled and left open. A mug of spilled coffee puddled
down one side of the desk. Written on the mug was the word Boss.

Rose fought panic as she moved in and surveyed the surreal scene before her. Principal Wendy Storme had not moved. The face on the twisted neck was frozen in an ugly grimace of terror—with mouth and eyes wider than normal. Her swollen jaws and neck had darkened to a macabre blue. A thin stream of drool crept down Wendy’s chin and her eyes stared unseeing at the wall beyond. Without notice, Wendy’s body flopped to the floor with a flaccid thud, virtually at Rose’s feet. 

Principal Wendy Storme was dead.

Amazon buy links: 


About the author:

A career educator, Susan Coryell has taught students from 7th grade through college-level. She earned a BA degree in English from Carson-Newman College and a Masters from George Mason University. She is listed in several different volumes of Who’s Who in Education and Who’s Who in Teaching.  Coryell belongs to Author’s Guild, Virginia Writers, and Lake Writers. She loves to talk with budding writers at schools, writers’ conferences and workshops. Her young adult anti-bully novel EAGLEBAIT is in its third edition for print and e-book, updated with cyber-bullying. EAGLEBAIT won the NY Public Library's "Books for the Teen Age," and the International Reading Association's "Young Adult Choice."

A RED, RED ROSE, first in a cozy mystery/Southern Gothic series, was nominated for a literary award with the Library of Virginia. BENEATH THE STONES, the sequel, was released in April of 2015. NOBODY KNOWS, the final novel in the Overhome Trilogy was published October, 2016.
A MURDER OF PRINCIPLE is under contract with The Wild Rose Press and was released March 12, 2018

The author has long been interested in concerns about culture and society in the South, where hard-felt, long-held feelings battle with modern ideas.  The ghosts slipped in, to her surprise.
When not writing, Ms. Coryell enjoys boating, kayaking, golf and yoga. She and her husband, Ned, love to travel, especially when any of their seven grandchildren are involved.
Please visit Susan Coryell’s website: www.susancoryellauthor.com and her blog: www.susancoryellauthor.blogspot.com or contact her on Facebook and Twitter.

Amazon Links:
A Red, Red Rose: http://a.co/0eoAvPC
 Beneath the Stones: http://a.co/fVIowQ8
Nobody Knows:  http://a.co/aoXACMd

Diane's Review

 A Great Whodunit. What happens when a new principal single-handedly destroys the camaraderie, spirit, and good name of a high school and some of its staff? People want to kill her. (I’m lucky I never had a principal like her!) 

Typical of most mysteries, the dead body shows up immediately. Then, Author Coryell does something different. She takes the reader back in time, so we can understand what led to such a drastic event. High schools employ many people. Consequently, many characters inhabit this story. Some are lightly described, but the main characters—Principal Wendy Storme, English teacher Rose Lane, and her intern Penny Bright are well-developed. The story is told through Rose and Penny’s points-of-view, and it’s done well.

Step-by-step, Principal Storme wreaks havoc on people’s lives—demoting here, replacing there, even firing—giving everyone, not just in the high school but in the community as well, a motive to kill her. At first, I thought some of the things Storme did were illegal. But I’ve been out of the education world for over thirty years. I didn’t realize how much has changed, especially in a right-to-work state. It’s surprising what goes on behind closed doors in a high school. If you enjoy a good mystery, you’ll enjoy this book.

5 Stars


Monday, March 12, 2018

NUMBERS NEVER LIE Character Sketch: Ben




Before I let you know more about one of the characters in my work-in-progress, I need share the brainstorm I got last week. A new (and improved) title. What used to be Unpredictable Nature is now Numbers Never Lie. When I started this story back in 2003, the focus was on camping with the girls. I’m a better writer now than fifteen years ago. (I should hope so.) As I’ve been editing and revising this story, it hit me that Jack’s discoveries while doing an audit is pivotal. Audit, numbers. Number Never Lie. (In fact, I didn’t realize until today that I used that phrase during Jack’s character sketch.)

Back to the character sketches. I’ve already shared Maggie’s, Drew’s, and Jack’s. Now, it’s Ben’s turn. While he’s a secondary character, Ben Voorheis plays a large part in the story.

Here’s a physical description of him from the story:

He enveloped her [Maggie] in a one-armed bear hug. He smelled of cologne—a heavy, exotic scent—and mint. Though about the same height as Maggie, Ben Voorheis was burly and about a year older. His blond-white hair, blue eyes, and ‘apple’ cheeks were a testament to his Dutch ancestors who—like so many—settled in West Michigan.

Ben met Jack at the big-name accounting firm where they first worked after college. They became friends, eventually left the firm, and started their own accounting business. They were a good match. Ben was more of a people person than Jack, while Jack had a stronger drive. They each had their own clients. Though Ben brought in more, he shared. Ben’s best quality is his loyalty to his friends.

Five years ago, when he and Jack began their business partnership, Ben fell for Maggie. When she let him know she wasn’t interested in that type of relationship, he backed off. Sort of. Though he often joked how she’d ruined him for other women, he never lost his romantic interest in her.

A stupid stunt on his motorcycle sidelined Ben for several weeks, Hospital and rehab left him unable to perform his business duties. As they always did when one became overloaded, the other stepped in. Jack took on the audit of one of Ben’s clients, and one of his friends.

Here's the blurb:

A shocking secret brings danger to Jack Sinclair and his sister Maggie. 

As kids, they were the fearless threesome. As adults, Jack's an accountant; Drew, a lawyer; Maggie, a teacher and camping troop leader. Returning from a weekend camping trip, Maggie receives horrifying news. She refuses to believe her brother’s fatal car crash was an accident. If the police won’t investigate, she’ll do it herself. Convincing Drew Campbell to help is her only recourse.

Drew Campbell was too busy to return his best friend’s phone call. Too busy to attend a camping meeting important to his teen daughter. Too busy to stay in touch with Jack. Logic and reason indicate Jack’s accident was just that--an accident caused by fatigue and fog. Prodded by guilt, he’ll help Maggie even if he thinks she’s wrong.


A break-in at Jack’s condo convinces Maggie she’s right. Then her home is searched. What did Jack leave behind?

I’ve been sharing snippets from Numbers Never Lie every weekend since February 3rd. Stop by every Saturday or Sunday to read something new.

Thanks for stopping by. This is going to be a busy week, blogwise. Tomorrow, I’ll be at Paranormal Romantics, writing about my Muse.

On Friday, it’s my turn over at The Roses of Prose where I’ll talk about my progress this month (compared to my miserable February).

On Saturday, I’ll share another snippet from Numbers Never Lie.

Today, my friend Susan Coryell’s latest mystery, A Murder of Principle, was released. See my review.

On Thursday, Shannon Lawrence visits.

In between all the blogging, I’ll be chugging along on Numbers Never Lie.


Saturday, March 10, 2018

#WeWriWa - NUMBERS NEVER LIE: We Need to Talk


Welcome to Weekend Writing Warriors where authors share an 8 - 10 sentence snippet. Be sure to visit the other authors. You can find them here

Thanks for all your comments on last week's snippet. I'm sharing a work-in-progress, a romantic suspense about a woman who doesn't believe her accountant brother's car crash was an accident. I had a brainstorm this week and came up with a better title. Numbers Never Lie

Suggestions are very welcome on the blurb as well as the snippet. Please excuse the rogue commas.

Today's snippet is from the end of Chapter One. After visiting his sister in the middle of the day, Jack returned to the plant where he was doing an audit. The client was his partner's, but since Ben had been hospitalized after a motorcycle accident, Jack had taken on the job. It's late at night and fog had come in off Lake Michigan.


Even before he pushed open the heavy glass door, Jack saw that the janitors were right; not only was the light at the end of the parking lot out, the one at this end barely penetrated the fog. He clicked on the flashlight on his cell phone, but it only shone a foot or so in front of him.
Hearing a soft skitter near the dumpster, his first thought was rats, and he shuddered then clicked his remote—from ten feet away, his head- and taillights barely penetrated the mist.
Weary beyond belief, he dragged himself to his car, he needed to return to the plant tomorrow—make that later today since it was after twelve-thirty—to do more digging in the company’s files. He couldn’t believe what he’d discovered so far; this went way beyond anything he imagined, the implications—
“Jack?”
Startled by the familiar voice, he dropped his keys, and his phone slipped out of his fingers and skidded away. When he peered in direction of the sound, a figure stepped away from the dumpster’s hulking shape.
            
“Jack, we need to talk.”
Jack had one thought. Thank God, I stopped at Maggie’s.

[end of Chapter One]


Here's the tentative blurb:

A shocking secret brings danger to Jack Sinclair and his sister Maggie. 

As kids, they were the fearless threesome. As adults, Jack's an accountant; Drew, a lawyer; Maggie, a teacher and camping troop leader. Returning from a weekend camping trip, Maggie receives horrifying news. She refuses to believe her brother’s fatal car crash was an accident. If the police won’t investigate, she’ll do it herself. Convincing Drew Campbell to help is her only recourse.

Drew Campbell was too busy to return his best friend’s phone call. Too busy to attend a camping meeting important to his teen daughter. Too busy to stay in touch with Jack. Logic and reason indicate Jack’s accident was just that--an accident caused by fatigue and fog. Prodded by guilt, he’ll help Maggie even if he thinks she’s wrong.

A break-in at Jack’s condo convinces Maggie she’s right. Then her home is searched. What did Jack leave behind?


Two of my books are on sale at Smashwords. Today (Saturday) is the last day.


The Pilot (first book in the Outer Rim series) and The Case of the Bygone Brother (first Alex O'Hara PI mystery) are 50% off. 


Wednesday, March 7, 2018

#IWSG: Bad Month



 It's the 1st Wednesday of March. Happy Insecure Writers Support Group Day. IWSG is the brainchild of Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds! Thanks, Alex, for starting this group and keeping it going. And thanks to this month's awesome hosts: Mary Aalgaard, Bish Denham, Jennifer Hawes, Gwen Gardner, and me.

Last month, I wrote about having the winter blahs. I think I jinxed myself by mentioning them. It continued throughout February. I forced myself to write, and I did make progress. Some progress. My enthusiasm for the romantic suspense dwindled. Because technology has changed since I first wrote this story, so many details needed to be changed. I’ve been sharing snippets each weekend with Weekend Writing Warriors and have gotten good feedback.

I have made some progress, finally coming up with a better title for the romantic suspense than Unpredictable Nature. It’s now titled Numbers Never Lie. So much better and more to the point of the story. I wrote over 7k words this month on both that story and the Alex O’Hara mystery, which is more fun. Still, I’m behind on where I wanted to be by now.

My supporters would say, hey, you’re 7k farther than you were last month. I know, but it’s still disappointing. With more sunshine and the flowers poking their tips out, I’m sure that March will be a better month.

Optional question of the month: How do you celebrate when you achieve a writing goal / finish a story?

I don’t really. I tell Hubs, and he says good job. That’s about it. Maybe I need to celebrate small achievements, like meeting my writing goal for the week. I’ve been having a pity party for six weeks. It’s time to celebrate progress.


On a side note: I’m participating in Read an Ebook Week by discounting two of my books 50%. If you scroll down to the previous post, you can read about them.

I hope we all have a great month.

Click here to find others on the Insecure Writers Support Group Blog Hop. Or go to IWSG on Facebook to see who’s blogging today.


Monday, March 5, 2018

Read an Ebook Week #Sale

https://www.smashwords.com/books/category/1/newest/1

I'm excited to participate in this year's Read an Ebook Week sponsored by Smashwords. 

I love the phrase associated with this promo, "Lose Yourself in a Good Book." Books have transported me to the past, the future, and all around the universe. I've often lost myself in a good book. Hubs will say something, I'll agree (uh huh), then ask what he said. Frustrates him to no end. LOL I love to read before sleep. Since writing is my job, my time is flexible. Reading well into the early morning isn't a problem. Often, I can't put down that book until the end.

I chose two of my books to put on sale (half off) for this week. Click on the title to be taken to the site.

The Pilot: the first book in the Outer Rim series.


Science Fiction Romance

There's no place like home and he just stole hers. Cargo hauler, risk taker Celera d'Enfaden must work with rule-bound Administrator Trevarr Jovano to save her brother from a galactic gangster.







The Case of the Bygone Brother: the first book in the Alex O'Hara mystery series

Small Town . . . Big Case.

Alex O’Hara finally gets a case that will give her bottom line a much needed boost. She might even be able to change her diet from ramen noodles to prime rib. All she has to do is track down a man who’s been missing for over ten years. Piece of cake . . . until an old flame arrives and a mugger roughs her up with orders to back off.



You can browse for more books here. There has to be thousands of books listed for sale.

No matter what book you choose to read this week, have fun, enjoy . . . lose yourself in that book.


I'll be back on Wednesday for Insecure Writers Support Group, a fun blog hop.

Have a great week.