Welcome.

Glad you stopped by. I hope you'll stop by again for Monday Morning Musings, Meet the Author Thursday, Weekend Writing Warriors, and guests whenever they drop in.

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

#IWSG: Words Have Power


Happy Insecure Writers Support Group Day. IWSG is the brainchild of Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds! Thanks, Alex, for starting this group and keeping it going. 

Thanks to this month's awesome hosts:  Lee Lowery, Juneta Key, Yvonne Ventresca, and T. Powell Coltrin! 

OPTIONAL IWSG Day Question: 

What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?

I was in grade school--maybe 3rd or 4th grade--when I encountered bullying. My mother drilled into our heads that "sticks and stone may break your bones, words will never hurt you." I totally disagree. Words do hurt. But, I guess that's why I never told her about the nasty things kids said. I figured she'd say ignore it, or don't let it bother you. 

Easier said than done.

I don't remember getting hit during recess, but I do remember taunts. Words do hurt. Mean words have the power to make you forget good times. When young teachers curry favor with their students--aka the cool kids--they ignore complaints from outsiders. 

Thank goodness, we didn't have social media when I was in grade school and junior high. I was lucky to go to a different high school than those "cool kids" so I got away from them. I never wished ill of those bullies. I hope their children and/or grandchildren are/were never bullied. But if they were, I wonder if they recall their own bullying.

Words hurt. We have to be careful how we use them.


On a happier note: last month, I shared how I uploaded the wrong file to Amazon, one full of typos and other errors. You all were so supportive. Your sympathy and kind words helped more than you can know. Amazon helped as soon as I told them what happened. They said they sent out emails to those who purchased Rescuing Mara's Father the first few days after it was released saying that an update was available. (I didn't receive one, but maybe they didn't think I needed it.) If you purchased my book, check your "Devices and Content" to see if an update is available. I do apologize for the inconvenience. Anyway, I'm happy they responded and helped me fix the situation. 

My "official" blog tour ended last night. I have a couple of guest spots in May.  Special thanks to all the IWSG members who offered places on their blogs or who spotlighted my new release. As I've often said, you all are welcome to visit me when you have a new release.

GREAT NEWS


The Anthology is available now. 
Find love at the ball…

Can a fake dating game show lead to love? Will a missing key free a clock-bound prince? Can a softball pitcher and a baseball catcher work together? Is there a vampire living in Paradise, Newfoundland? What’s more important—a virtual Traveler or a virtual date to the ball?

Ten authors explore young love in all its facets, from heartbreak to budding passion. Featuring the talents of L.G. Keltner, Jennifer Lane, C.D. Gallant-King, Elizabeth Mueller, Angela Brown, Myles Christensen, Deborah Solice, Carrie-Anne Brownian, Anstice Brown, and Chelsea Marie Ballard.

Hand-picked by a panel of agents and authors, these ten tales will mystify and surprise even as they touch your heart. Don your mask and join the party…



I hope the month of May brings lots of inspiration.


Click here to find others on the Insecure Writers Support Group Blog Hop. Or go to IWSG on Facebook to see who’s blogging today.


40 comments:

  1. I agree with you that words hurt. I was taunted as a kid too and didn't have many friends.

    Glad Amazon helped you with the download of the wrong file. And hope that your blog tour and book release went well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Natalie. I'm always surprised when I read about others who were bullied as kids, even famous actors. We always think we're alone.

      Delete
  2. Sorry to hear you were bullied, Diane. I think words hurt more than the sticks and stones. Cuts and bruises heal, but often emotional/mental wounds are with you for life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, J.H. I only remember cuts and bruises because of photos (think big white bandage on knees). Obviously, I still remember the taunts.

      Delete
  3. Words can definitely hurt.
    That's great that you were able to sort everything out with Amazon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Sarah. Although I had to jump through some hoops, Amazon worked quickly with me to fix the problem.

      Delete
  4. I never told my mom about the hurtful things said during elementary and Jr High. By the time High School came, I was so used to the hurtful words, I learned to at least not react to them. Still hurt. To this day, I think those words affect how I think of myself. So I agree with you, words have power!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so sorry you went through that, too, Elizabeth. Yes, it does affect how I think of myself. This topic dredged up bad memories.

      Delete
  5. You're so right, Diane. I'd almost take a punch in the stomach over taunting, terrible words. That pain would stick with me a lot longer than the one in my stomach.

    ReplyDelete
  6. How well I remember that quote, sticks and stone may break my bones but words will never hurt me. You're so right Words can hurt deeper than any slap or beating. They are phrases you never forget.

    Shalom aleichem,
    Pat G @ EverythingMustChange

    ReplyDelete
  7. 'sticks and stones' - you are soo right. Words don't just hurt, they can slash and burn. (Unfortunately for me, I'm one of those people who can never think up a come-back until hours later)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, me too, Angela. My characters do. LOL I wish I'd had a sense of humor back then and able to laugh off the hurtful words.

      Delete
  8. The words hurt a lot worse than the physical crap I endured, because they were personal. Even though getting dragged into a doorway and beaten up by older girls was far from enjoyable, that didn't hurt as much as the hateful words that were constantly directed at me. What hurt worse than the beating was the fact that the adults didn't care enough to do anything about it. I learned early on that I was the sort of person that no-one will ever like or care about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My heart hurts for you. What an awful thing to endure. Especially when the people who are supposed to protect us do nothing. Hugs.

      Delete
  9. Teasing and taunting definitely hurts. It really can stay with you, like a stain you can't remove.

    I am so glad I didn't grow up with social media.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great allusion, Madeline. An unremovable stain. I hadn't thought about the bullying for a long time, yet it immediately sprung to mind with this topic.

      Delete
  10. I used to hear the same thing from my parents. My terror started in grade seven and living in a small town there was no other school. Eventually it came to head and resolved itself, but life was friggin hard for a while.

    Don't get me started on the adults in my life though...;-P

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think people who use the quote about sticks & stones never endured bullying. I'm glad the issue resolved itself. It still hurts, though.

      Delete
  11. Some people only feel strong when they are putting others down.
    Glad Amazon helped get the word out about the new version.
    Thanks for mentioning the IWSG anthology!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex, you nailed it. Those people are so insecure that they can only survive by hurting others.

      Delete
  12. Ignore them is good advice, but that's from an adult's perspective - they aren't thinking like a child. Ignoring it is almost impossible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As adults, we see the big picture. To a kid, it's such a part of our lives we are immersed in it. Thanks, Diane

      Delete
  13. Words do hurt. I was bullied in elementary school and middle school.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing, Chrys. I wonder if that sensitivity is what makes us artists.

      Delete
  14. I'm glad Amazon helped you! Bones can heal, but the wounds words leave behind never truly go away... which is why we torture our characters, imagining them with the faces of our childhood tormentors ;-)

    Ronel visiting for #IWSG day: Help Me, Please!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Kids can be so cruel and what they say really can stick with you your whole life :( I have my own share of verbal scars. They've faded over time, but they're a good reminder of the power of language.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Cruel words can leave scars for a lifetime. And, as you pointed out, sometimes a teacher can be part of the problem. It's such a shame to realize that bullying is the norm, rather than the exception.

    On a lighter note, I'm so glad you got your manuscript kerfluffle smoothed over. What a relief that must be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love the word kerfluffle, Lee. Yeah, it was a relief to get it all straightened out.

      Delete
  17. Glad you got your Amazon-book-upload smoothed out!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Glad to hear Amazon helped you with your book. Looks like a great read grab my copy. Yeah, kids are cruel. I was the fat kid in school so do remember that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Juneta. I hope you enjoy it. Not only was I fat, I wore glasses. Double taunts. Oh, well. I'm still fat and still wear glasses and heck if I care. lol

      Delete
  19. It is such a fallacy that words don't hurt. They deliver the cruellest cut, one that doesn't heal with time.
    I've just booked a blog tour. Glad to hear yours went well. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck with your blog tour. I set my own up (lots of help from the IWSG people). But it's a lot of work.

      Delete
  20. Words do have power, either negative or positive, and they can do so much damage. Luckily, we can all learn to use them for good too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Nick. You're right. Using words to heal is so important.

      Delete

Love getting your comments. BTW, your comment won't show up until you refresh the page. Isn't that a pain? Thanks for stopping by.